Photography & Arts: Black & White Edition

“Life is like a good black and white photograph, there’s black, there’s white, and lots of shades in between.” – Karl Heiner

As a Western culture, we like our neat boxes. Having figured out ways to file, sort and organize almost everything, it’s all too easy to think that we’ve got most things figured out. Plain and simple. The habit dates back to Pythagoras, the Greek philosopher who influenced minds 2,500 years ago with his Table of Opposites.

Odd and even.
Light and dark.
Right and wrong.
White and black.

While this need for structure has made our lives easier—how often has it led us astray? Divided. Separated. Torn by rifts of our own making. Dr. Martin Luther King’s words on the importance of enlightened inclusion continue to resonate to this day: “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Ancient pagan cultures believed that lines become blurred in October—we become more sensitive to the subtle layers—the heartbeat—of our world as the veil of reality lifts.

And so, this month, we’re celebrating grey—the color of wisdom.

Expand and enjoy,
Paulina Stachnik
Photography & Arts Ed.

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Photo by: Diane Arbus

Photo by: Luke Ritta

Photo by Luke Ritta

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